Films

JUNGLE GUARD | ឆ្មាំព្រៃ | Trailer

JUNGLE GUARD|ឆ្មាំព្រៃ A FILM BY MAKARA OUCH CAMBODIA | Documentary | English Subtitle Duration: 60mn JUNGLE GUARD​ is a documentary film that portrays the life of a unique Buddhist monk community that has voluntarily assumed the role of protector of a large parcel of natural forest and its indigenous wildlife, fish and related resources. The forest, known as the Monk Commune Forest, is located in Anlong Veng district, the last stronghold of the Khmer Rouge rebel army and its surviving leaders, in Cambodia’s Oddar Meanchey province. ​SLEUK RITH MOTION PICTURE PRESENTS in associate with DOCUMENTATION CENTER OF CAMBODIA SLEUK RITH INSTITUTE, ANLONG VENG PEACE CENTER Production: SLEUK RITH MOTION PICTURE Executive Director: YOUK CHHANG Director/Producer: MAKARA OUCH Website: www.sleukrithmotionpicture.com/jungle-guard.html

A Film & Edited by Fatily Sa & Makara Ouch Interviewed by Fatily Sa Production Assistant Sophat Morm Subtitle Translated by Kimsroy Sokvisal Funded by J.B. and M.K. Pritzker Family Foundation Supported by The Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center and Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law, with the Core Support From USAID and Sida (Sweden) ©Documentation Center of Cambodia DC-Cam, 2013

A history of Democratic Kampuchea text book distribution.
A history of Democratic Kampuchea text book distribution.

After five years of waging civil war, Cambodian communist forces known as the Khmer Rouge marched into Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975. They immediately began forcibly evacuating the residents of the capital and other cities, displacing more than two million people to the countryside. The city dwellers joined rural Cambodians in an ill-fated attempt to turn the country back to year zero and establish a peasant-led agrarian society. Most of the population was forced to work 14 or more hours a day, building dikes and canals, and growing rice and other crops. The Khmer Rouge also abolished schools, money, private property, courts of law, markets, businesses, the practice of religion, and nearly all personal freedoms. Over the next nearly four years, as many as one of every four Cambodians died from malnutrition, hard labor, or disease. At least another 200,000 were executed without trial. Vietnamese troops and the forces of the United Front for the National Salvation of Kampuchea invaded Cambodia on Christmas Day 1978. Encountering only a fleeing Khmer Rouge military and a weakened population, they moved quickly through the country and reached Phnom Penh on January 7, 1979. By late afternoon they occupied the city, which was empty save for a few hundred prisoners of war and people in hiding waiting to escape. The next day, two Vietnamese officials who accompanied the invasion were drawn to the stench from a compound in the southern part of the city. There, they discovered the most important of the Khmer Rouge prisons, the former Tuol Sleng High School, which was known to the Khmer Rouge by the code name S-21. Tuol Sleng was used to detain people the Khmer Rouge considered to be enemies of the state, including members of their own ranks. Of the estimated 14,000 men, women, and children held there, only about a dozen are known to have survived. Two men who were imprisoned at Tuol Sleng, Bou Meng and Chum Mei, and a former guard, Him Huy, were interviewed for this film in 2006, more than 25 years after the tragedy of Democratic Kampuchea. Funding for this project was generously provided by the Soros Foundations Open Society Institute under its Documents and Confronting the Past Affinity Group Project Support for DC-Cam’s operations is provided by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (Sida). S-21 Survivors today are: 1) Vann Nath aka Heng Nath, 2) Chum Mei, 3) Bou Meng, 4) Nhem Sal, 5) Touch Tem.

After five years of waging civil war, Cambodian communist forces known as the Khmer Rouge marched into Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975. They immediately began forcibly evacuating the residents of the capital and other cities, displacing more than two million people to the countryside. The city dwellers joined rural Cambodians in an ill-fated attempt to turn the country back to year zero and establish a peasant-led agrarian society. Most of the population was forced to work 14 or more hours a day, building dikes and canals, and growing rice and other crops. The Khmer Rouge also abolished schools, money, private property, courts of law, markets, businesses, the practice of religion, and nearly all personal freedoms. Over the next nearly four years, as many as one of every four Cambodians died from malnutrition, hard labor, or disease. At least another 200,000 were executed without trial. Vietnamese troops and the forces of the United Front for the National Salvation of Kampuchea invaded Cambodia on Christmas Day 1978. Encountering only a fleeing Khmer Rouge military and a weakened population, they moved quickly through the country and reached Phnom Penh on January 7, 1979. By late afternoon they occupied the city, which was empty save for a few hundred prisoners of war and people in hiding waiting to escape. The next day, two Vietnamese officials who accompanied the invasion were drawn to the stench from a compound in the southern part of the city. There, they discovered the most important of the Khmer Rouge prisons, the former Tuol Sleng High School, which was known to the Khmer Rouge by the code name S-21. Tuol Sleng was used to detain people the Khmer Rouge considered to be enemies of the state, including members of their own ranks. Of the estimated 14,000 men, women, and children held there, only about a dozen are known to have survived. Two men who were imprisoned at Tuol Sleng, Bou Meng and Chum Mei, and a former guard, Him Huy, were interviewed for this film in 2006, more than 25 years after the tragedy of Democratic Kampuchea. Funding for this project was generously provided by the Soros Foundations Open Society Institute under its Documents and Confronting the Past Affinity Group Project Support for DC-Cam’s operations is provided by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (Sida). S-21 Survivors today are: 1) Vann Nath aka Heng Nath, 2) Chum Mei, 3) Bou Meng, 4) Nhem Sal, 5) Touch Tem.

After five years of waging civil war, Cambodian communist forces known as the Khmer Rouge marched into Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975. They immediately began forcibly evacuating the residents of the capital and other cities, displacing more than two million people to the countryside. The city dwellers joined rural Cambodians in an ill-fated attempt to turn the country back to year zero and establish a peasant-led agrarian society. Most of the population was forced to work 14 or more hours a day, building dikes and canals, and growing rice and other crops. The Khmer Rouge also abolished schools, money, private property, courts of law, markets, businesses, the practice of religion, and nearly all personal freedoms. Over the next nearly four years, as many as one of every four Cambodians died from malnutrition, hard labor, or disease. At least another 200,000 were executed without trial. Vietnamese troops and the forces of the United Front for the National Salvation of Kampuchea invaded Cambodia on Christmas Day 1978. Encountering only a fleeing Khmer Rouge military and a weakened population, they moved quickly through the country and reached Phnom Penh on January 7, 1979. By late afternoon they occupied the city, which was empty save for a few hundred prisoners of war and people in hiding waiting to escape. The next day, two Vietnamese officials who accompanied the invasion were drawn to the stench from a compound in the southern part of the city. There, they discovered the most important of the Khmer Rouge prisons, the former Tuol Sleng High School, which was known to the Khmer Rouge by the code name S-21. Tuol Sleng was used to detain people the Khmer Rouge considered to be enemies of the state, including members of their own ranks. Of the estimated 14,000 men, women, and children held there, only about a dozen are known to have survived. Two men who were imprisoned at Tuol Sleng, Bou Meng and Chum Mei, and a former guard, Him Huy, were interviewed for this film in 2006, more than 25 years after the tragedy of Democratic Kampuchea. Funding for this project was generously provided by the Soros Foundations Open Society Institute under its Documents and Confronting the Past Affinity Group Project Support for DC-Cam’s operations is provided by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (Sida). S-21 Survivors today are: 1) Vann Nath aka Heng Nath, 2) Chum Mei, 3) Bou Meng, 4) Nhem Sal, 5) Touch Tem.

After five years of waging civil war, Cambodian communist forces known as the Khmer Rouge marched into Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975. They immediately began forcibly evacuating the residents of the capital and other cities, displacing more than two million people to the countryside. The city dwellers joined rural Cambodians in an ill-fated attempt to turn the country back to year zero and establish a peasant-led agrarian society. Most of the population was forced to work 14 or more hours a day, building dikes and canals, and growing rice and other crops. The Khmer Rouge also abolished schools, money, private property, courts of law, markets, businesses, the practice of religion, and nearly all personal freedoms. Over the next nearly four years, as many as one of every four Cambodians died from malnutrition, hard labor, or disease. At least another 200,000 were executed without trial. Vietnamese troops and the forces of the United Front for the National Salvation of Kampuchea invaded Cambodia on Christmas Day 1978. Encountering only a fleeing Khmer Rouge military and a weakened population, they moved quickly through the country and reached Phnom Penh on January 7, 1979. By late afternoon they occupied the city, which was empty save for a few hundred prisoners of war and people in hiding waiting to escape. The next day, two Vietnamese officials who accompanied the invasion were drawn to the stench from a compound in the southern part of the city. There, they discovered the most important of the Khmer Rouge prisons, the former Tuol Sleng High School, which was known to the Khmer Rouge by the code name S-21. Tuol Sleng was used to detain people the Khmer Rouge considered to be enemies of the state, including members of their own ranks. Of the estimated 14,000 men, women, and children held there, only about a dozen are known to have survived. Two men who were imprisoned at Tuol Sleng, Bou Meng and Chum Mei, and a former guard, Him Huy, were interviewed for this film in 2006, more than 25 years after the tragedy of Democratic Kampuchea. Funding for this project was generously provided by the Soros Foundations Open Society Institute under its Documents and Confronting the Past Affinity Group Project Support for DC-Cam’s operations is provided by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (Sida). S-21 Survivors today are: 1) Vann Nath aka Heng Nath, 2) Chum Mei, 3) Bou Meng, 4) Nhem Sal, 5) Touch Tem.

One night, newly married Tang Kim was told by the Khmer Rouge that she was being taken to live with her soldier husband. But instead, she and eight other women were sent to a rice field near her village for execution. Huddled on a dike with only one soldier to guard her, Tang Kim heard the screams of the other women being raped. Knowing she would be next, Tang Kim begged her guard for protection. But the other soldiers returned and raped her as well. This documentary relates the story of Tang Kim (who is a Buddhist nun today) and her constant struggles to come to terms with what happened to her during the Khmer Rouge regime. It has been screened in Thailand, the Brussels Film Festival, the Prix Bruno Mersch Film Festival, and the Museum of Modern Art and Asian Cultural Council in New York. It was also nominated as a finalist at the 2005 US ASEAN Film, Video and Photography Festival. Earnings from DVD productions of the film are being used to support the education of Taing Kims children. Copies of this film are available at the Documentation Center of Cambodias Public Information Room (66A Sihanouk Blvd., Phnom Penh, 023-211-875, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

One night, newly married Tang Kim was told by the Khmer Rouge that she was being taken to live with her soldier husband. But instead, she and eight other women were sent to a rice field near her village for execution. Huddled on a dike with only one soldier to guard her, Tang Kim heard the screams of the other women being raped. Knowing she would be next, Tang Kim begged her guard for protection. But the other soldiers returned and raped her as well. This documentary relates the story of Tang Kim (who is a Buddhist nun today) and her constant struggles to come to terms with what happened to her during the Khmer Rouge regime. It has been screened in Thailand, the Brussels Film Festival, the Prix Bruno Mersch Film Festival, and the Museum of Modern Art and Asian Cultural Council in New York. It was also nominated as a finalist at the 2005 US ASEAN Film, Video and Photography Festival. Earnings from DVD productions of the film are being used to support the education of Taing Kims children. Copies of this film are available at the Documentation Center of Cambodias Public Information Room (66A Sihanouk Blvd., Phnom Penh, 023-211-875, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

One night, newly married Tang Kim was told by the Khmer Rouge that she was being taken to live with her soldier husband. But instead, she and eight other women were sent to a rice field near her village for execution. Huddled on a dike with only one soldier to guard her, Tang Kim heard the screams of the other women being raped. Knowing she would be next, Tang Kim begged her guard for protection. But the other soldiers returned and raped her as well. This documentary relates the story of Tang Kim (who is a Buddhist nun today) and her constant struggles to come to terms with what happened to her during the Khmer Rouge regime. It has been screened in Thailand, the Brussels Film Festival, the Prix Bruno Mersch Film Festival, and the Museum of Modern Art and Asian Cultural Council in New York. It was also nominated as a finalist at the 2005 US ASEAN Film, Video and Photography Festival. Earnings from DVD productions of the film are being used to support the education of Taing Kims children. Copies of this film are available at the Documentation Center of Cambodias Public Information Room (66A Sihanouk Blvd., Phnom Penh, 023-211-875, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

One night, newly married Tang Kim was told by the Khmer Rouge that she was being taken to live with her soldier husband. But instead, she and eight other women were sent to a rice field near her village for execution. Huddled on a dike with only one soldier to guard her, Tang Kim heard the screams of the other women being raped. Knowing she would be next, Tang Kim begged her guard for protection. But the other soldiers returned and raped her as well. This documentary relates the story of Tang Kim (who is a Buddhist nun today) and her constant struggles to come to terms with what happened to her during the Khmer Rouge regime. It has been screened in Thailand, the Brussels Film Festival, the Prix Bruno Mersch Film Festival, and the Museum of Modern Art and Asian Cultural Council in New York. It was also nominated as a finalist at the 2005 US ASEAN Film, Video and Photography Festival. Earnings from DVD productions of the film are being used to support the education of Taing Kims children. Copies of this film are available at the Documentation Center of Cambodias Public Information Room (66A Sihanouk Blvd., Phnom Penh, 023-211-875, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

From 1975 to 1979, the Khmer Rouge regime was responsible for the deaths of approximately 1.7 million Cambodians, in one of the most brutal genocides of the 20th Century. After falling from power in 1979, the Khmer Rouge waged a civil war from the Thai border for nearly 20 years. But by the late 1990s, the regime was in a state of collapse, and the Royal Government of Cambodia began working with the United Nations to create a court to try senior Khmer Rouge leaders. An international tribunal was finally established in Phnom Penh under the official name: the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia for the Prosecution of Crimes Committed during the Period of Democratic Kampuchea. In 2006, the Documentation Center of Cambodia began a series of tours of the Extraordinary Chambers Court, to educate Cambodians about the workings of the Tribunal, and to help them participate in the justice process. The tours also brought participants to key Khmer Rouge sites so they could witness for themselves the actions of the regime. (See the tour report) The tours sought people from across Cambodian society, including Buddhist Nuns, Cham Muslims, students, and those living in poor areas with little access to information. For it is the thinking, that the court will be most effective, if the Cambodian people themselves are involved in the process. Funding for this project was generously provided by Royal Danish Embassy, with core support from The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)

From 1975 to 1979, the Khmer Rouge regime was responsible for the deaths of approximately 1.7 million Cambodians, in one of the most brutal genocides of the 20th Century. After falling from power in 1979, the Khmer Rouge waged a civil war from the Thai border for nearly 20 years. But by the late 1990s, the regime was in a state of collapse, and the Royal Government of Cambodia began working with the United Nations to create a court to try senior Khmer Rouge leaders. An international tribunal was finally established in Phnom Penh under the official name: the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia for the Prosecution of Crimes Committed during the Period of Democratic Kampuchea. In 2006, the Documentation Center of Cambodia began a series of tours of the Extraordinary Chambers Court, to educate Cambodians about the workings of the Tribunal, and to help them participate in the justice process. The tours also brought participants to key Khmer Rouge sites so they could witness for themselves the actions of the regime. (See the tour report) The tours sought people from across Cambodian society, including Buddhist Nuns, Cham Muslims, students, and those living in poor areas with little access to information. For it is the thinking, that the court will be most effective, if the Cambodian people themselves are involved in the process. Funding for this project was generously provided by Royal Danish Embassy, with core support from The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)

Contact

For information on our film project, please contact
Ouch Makara
truthmakara@dccam.org

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